Poesie Perfume

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  • Enchantress of Numbers: clean lemon and fresh lavender, corrupted by a ribbon of caramel and sweet amber

Enchantress of Numbers: clean lemon and fresh lavender, corrupted by a ribbon of caramel and sweet amber

from 6.50
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Enchantress of Numbers: clean lemon and fresh lavender, corrupted by a ribbon of caramel and sweet amber

from 6.50

“Forget this world and all its troubles and if possible

its multitudinous Charlatans – everything in short but

the Enchantress of Numbers.” -- Babbage

A rational and balanced blend of clean lemon and fresh lavender compose the symmetrical opening, while a fraction of tempting caramel and sweet amber twist through the remainder with a hint of madness.

In abhorrence of the wild imagination that was a reminder of Ada’s famously mad, bad, and dangerous-to-know father, Lord Byron, Ada Lovelace was raised by her mother to regulate her mind and adhere to a strict program of studies. A math prodigy at the age of 4, by the age of 12 Ada had designed a flying machine in the shape of a winged horse with a steam engine inside to power it.

Today she is considered by many to be the first computer programmer for her work creating an algorithm to be executed by Charles Babbage’s difference engine. But her wild, willful father’s contribution to her genetic makeup cannot be ignored -- Ada also tried to use mathematical schemes to win at gambling and consequently lost thousands of pounds on horse races.  Before her tragic, untimely death at the age of just 36, Ada became addicted to opiates prescribed by doctors and as a result developed erratic behavior near the end of her life, proving that she was still her father’s daughter after all.

Notes: clean lemon and fresh lavender, corrupted by a ribbon of caramel and sweet amber

Available in our travel-friendly 5 ml bottle with stainless steel rollerball or our 2 ml mini apothecary bottle.

 

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“Forget this world and all its troubles and if possible

its multitudinous Charlatans – everything in short but

the Enchantress of Numbers.” -- Babbage

A rational and balanced blend of clean lemon and fresh lavender compose the symmetrical opening, while a fraction of tempting caramel and sweet amber twist through the remainder with a hint of madness.

In abhorrence of the wild imagination that was a reminder of Ada’s famously mad, bad, and dangerous-to-know father, Lord Byron, Ada Lovelace was raised by her mother to regulate her mind and adhere to a strict program of studies. A math prodigy at the age of 4, by the age of 12 Ada had designed a flying machine in the shape of a winged horse with a steam engine inside to power it.

Today she is considered by many to be the first computer programmer for her work creating an algorithm to be executed by Charles Babbage’s difference engine. But her wild, willful father’s contribution to her genetic makeup cannot be ignored -- Ada also tried to use mathematical schemes to win at gambling and consequently lost thousands of pounds on horse races.  Before her tragic, untimely death at the age of just 36, Ada became addicted to opiates prescribed by doctors and as a result developed erratic behavior near the end of her life, proving that she was still her father’s daughter after all.

Notes: clean lemon and fresh lavender, corrupted by a ribbon of caramel and sweet amber

Available in our travel-friendly 5 ml bottle with stainless steel rollerball or our 2 ml mini apothecary bottle.