Poesie

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  • Illuminated: pineapple, pomelo and cherimoya, crushed pink peppercorns, delicate petals of jessamine and choisya

Illuminated: pineapple, pomelo and cherimoya, crushed pink peppercorns, delicate petals of jessamine and choisya

from 8.50
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Illuminated: pineapple, pomelo and cherimoya, crushed pink peppercorns, delicate petals of jessamine and choisya

from 8.50

the golden Sun adorned our Hemisphere

with skeins of judicious light

dispensing their colors

to visible things, and restored to outward sense,

their full operation

–keeping to more certain light, the World illuminated,

and I awake.”

— from First Dream

You may not find Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz featured as prominently on poetry shelves as that of Sylvia Plath — not many 17th century nuns from colonial Mexico are. But she’s worth seeking out, not only for her poetry but because she was a boundary-busting broad. A child prodigy from a poor, obscure family, Juana’s redoubtable intellect and insatiable thirst for knowledge got her recognized at court, where she wrote plays and poems, studied music and all branches of knowledge, and interacted with the most learned men there.

Because she felt she was unsuited for marriage and wanted the freedom to study and write, Juana joined a convent in Mexico City, where she lived out the rest of her life. There, she continued her studies and writing, collecting a library of over 4000 books. Juana didn’t limit herself poetry, but wrote plays, mathematical treatises, and — most importantly — what is considered by many to be the first published feminist manifesto in 1691.

Unfortunately, Juana’s manifesto drew the ire of the Catholic church and as a result, she relinquished her books and no longer published. She died four years later while caring for other nuns during an outbreak of the plague. Although her voice was silenced for a time, it still rings out. Today, Sor Juana is considered a national icon and her image appears on Mexican currency.

The scent inspired by Sor Juana is a celebration of delectable Mexican fruits and tropical flowers. Juicy pineapple and pomelo meld with creamy cherimoya and a delicate, almost transparent veil of jessamine and choisya (Mexican orange blossom). The pungency of crushed pink peppercorn adds a delightful piquancy that balances the sweetness of the fruits and flowers.

Notes: pineapple, pomelo and cherimoya are sprinkled with crushed pink peppercorns and delicate petals of  jessamine and choisya

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the golden Sun adorned our Hemisphere

with skeins of judicious light

dispensing their colors

to visible things, and restored to outward sense,

their full operation

–keeping to more certain light, the World illuminated,

and I awake.”

— from First Dream

You may not find Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz featured as prominently on poetry shelves as that of Sylvia Plath — not many 17th century nuns from colonial Mexico are. But she’s worth seeking out, not only for her poetry but because she was a boundary-busting broad. A child prodigy from a poor, obscure family, Juana’s redoubtable intellect and insatiable thirst for knowledge got her recognized at court, where she wrote plays and poems, studied music and all branches of knowledge, and interacted with the most learned men there.

Because she felt she was unsuited for marriage and wanted the freedom to study and write, Juana joined a convent in Mexico City, where she lived out the rest of her life. There, she continued her studies and writing, collecting a library of over 4000 books. Juana didn’t limit herself poetry, but wrote plays, mathematical treatises, and — most importantly — what is considered by many to be the first published feminist manifesto in 1691.

Unfortunately, Juana’s manifesto drew the ire of the Catholic church and as a result, she relinquished her books and no longer published. She died four years later while caring for other nuns during an outbreak of the plague. Although her voice was silenced for a time, it still rings out. Today, Sor Juana is considered a national icon and her image appears on Mexican currency.

The scent inspired by Sor Juana is a celebration of delectable Mexican fruits and tropical flowers. Juicy pineapple and pomelo meld with creamy cherimoya and a delicate, almost transparent veil of jessamine and choisya (Mexican orange blossom). The pungency of crushed pink peppercorn adds a delightful piquancy that balances the sweetness of the fruits and flowers.

Notes: pineapple, pomelo and cherimoya are sprinkled with crushed pink peppercorns and delicate petals of  jessamine and choisya